CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 6, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 6, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: First Monday Life Drawing


Date: April 6, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Come out and draw! What are you doing Monday night anyhow???

Bring your tools and join us in drawing a professional life model every first Monday of the month.

All skill levels welcome. No judgment, just a friendly environment in which to practice, create, and have a great time.

The 3-hour figure drawing session takes place upstairs in the OSH Great Room, which unfortunately is not ADA accessible. The space is comfortable, clean and well lit. Chairs for everyone.

Bring your tools (no oil, acrylic or sprays, please).

We will do an hour of gestures and short poses, finishing with a 2 hour-long pose. This is an uninstructed class.

Book Your Spot!

Artwork by Bonnie S. Chen.

Start time: 7:00 pm

End time: 10:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Old Stone House (in J.J. Byrne Playground)



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 7, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 7, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 8, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 9, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 9, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 8:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 10, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 10, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: April 10, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Con Edison Family Days


Date: April 11, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Visit the Morris-Jumel Mansion on the second Saturday of every month for ConEd sponsored Family Days.

Step into another century as you explore the period rooms of Manhattan’s oldest house. Join Morris-Jumel Mansion Museum's educators in the colonial kitchen to create hands-on arts and crafts, while learning about the historic origins and significance of the crafts you make! Draw connections between the past and present by comparing and contrasting colonial life, tools, and toys with your contemporary world.

Admission is free to the public. Free, one-hour docent tours are offered at 11:00 a.m. (Spanish-language tour) and at noon (English-language tour).

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 2:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 923-8008

Location: Morris-Jumel Mansion (in Roger Morris Park)



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 11, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: April 11, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 11, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 12, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho


Date: April 12, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.

You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th-century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the 2:00 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.

Purchase tickets online.

Start time: 12:30 pm

End time: 1:30 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: April 12, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 12, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 13, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 13, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 14, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 14, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 15, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 16, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 16, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 8:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 17, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 17, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: April 17, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: 'April Is the Cruellest Month' Candlelight Ghost Tour


Date: April 17, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

On this 50-minute tour, you’ll hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them, as well as the spine-tingling results of ongoing paranormal investigations.

Purchase tickets online.

Start time: 6:30 pm

End time: 7:30 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 18, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: April 18, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 18, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 19, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: April 19, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 19, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 20, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: Spring in Richmond Town


Date: April 20, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Spring has sprung at Historic Richmond Town! Enjoy the blossoming grounds of Historic Richmond Town for our Spring in Richmond Town event.

You will have the opportunity to fashion flower crowns, hunt for eggs, dance around the maypole, and meet the Easter Bunny. We will have delicious food trucks and activities all day!

For more information, please visit historicrichmondtown.org.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone: (718) 351-1611 ext. 266

Location: Historic Richmond Town



CANCELLED: Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 20, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 21, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



CANCELLED: JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 21, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



CANCELLED: Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 22, 2020

Please note: this event has been cancelled.

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 23, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 23, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 8:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 24, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 24, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: April 24, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 25, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: April 25, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 25, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



Community Baking Day


Date: April 26, 2020

Come join your neighbors at the outdoor wood-fired oven at the Old Stone House.

You can bring any dish or recipe — from bread to chicken, from cookies to pie.

You don't have to share what you bake, but you will find many willing taste-testers! Kids are welcome and generally have a great time. Non-bakers are also welcome to come hang out and volunteer for taste-testing duty!

Firing the oven will start around 9:00 a.m., and we'll bake from noon-ish until 4:00 p.m. Drop by any time! Keep in mind, when it gets busy there may be a wait of an hour or so until a spot opens up in the oven.

We'll be standing around outside the entire time, so be sure to dress with that in mind. The weather can be unpredictable. We will bake even if it is cold or raining, however, if it is windy we may cancel.

Sign up online

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Old Stone House (in J.J. Byrne Playground)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 26, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho


Date: April 26, 2020

Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.

You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th-century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the 2:00 p.m. p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.

Purchase tickets online.

Start time: 12:30 pm

End time: 1:30 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: April 26, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 26, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 27, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 27, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 28, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: April 28, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 29, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Illustrated Talk– Aegean Breezes: Greek Revival Architecture in America and New York, 1800-1840


Date: April 29, 2020

Join us for a wide-ranging look at what we call the “Greek Revival” in American architecture, a phenomenon much more complex than the simplistic name suggests.

We will look at the origins of “Neoclassicism” in 17th- and 18th-century European architecture and archaeology, and its migration across the Atlantic in the 18th and early 19th centuries, at the works of such architects in America as Latrobe, Mills, Strickland, Town, Davis, and Walter, and at Greek Revival New York, including the adaptation of the Greek temple to the humble row house. In New York, we will discuss Sailors’ Snug Harbor, La Grange Terrace, the Custom House of 1833-42, 1-13 Washington Square North, and several other works, not least 29 East 4th St., the Merchant’s House Museum, an unrivaled resource for the study of Neoclassicism in urban domestic architecture in America. The lavishly illustrated lecture will help to place the Merchant’s House in its proper context in architectural history.

After the talk, join Francis Morrone for a reception in the Museum’s 19th-century garden.

A collaboration with the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art.

Purchase tickets online.

About Francis Morrone
Francis Monroe is an architectural historian and the author of twelve books, including “Guide to New York City Urban Landscapes” (W.W. Norton, 2013) and, with Henry Hope Reed, “The New York Public Library: The Architecture and Decoration of the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building” (W.W. Norton, 2011), as well as architectural guidebooks to Philadelphia and to Brooklyn. His “History of the East Village and Its Architecture” was published in 2019 by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation through a grant from the Preservation League of New York State. He is the recipient of the Arthur Ross Award of the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art, the Landmarks Lion Award of the Historic Districts Council, and New York University’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Travel and Leisure Magazine named him one of the thirteen best tour guides in the world.

Start time: 6:30 pm

End time: 8:30 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: April 30, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: April 30, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 8:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 1, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: May 1, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: May 1, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: May 2, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: May 2, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: May 2, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



Spellbound Theatre: Stand Clear of the Closing Doors, Please


Date: May 3, 2020

Catbear is back for a special sensory-friendly story at this 10:00 a.m. performance.

This story follows a lost toy, Catbear, as he travels through the tunnels of New York City on six different subway lines, looking for his owner. Each train is unique, and Catbear experiences all the sights and sounds of New York City before landing home again.

Interactive and intimate, this show is ideal for children ages 2-5.

Purchase tickets online

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 11:30 am

Contact phone:

Location: Old Stone House (in J.J. Byrne Playground)



Spellbound Theatre: Stand Clear of the Closing Doors, Please


Date: May 3, 2020

This storytelling performance follows a lost toy, Catbear, as he travels through the tunnels of New York City on six different subway lines, looking for his owner. Each train is unique, and Catbear experiences all the sights and sounds of New York City before landing home again.

Interactive and intimate, this show is ideal for children ages 2-5.

Purchase tickets online.

Start time: 11:30 am

End time: 12:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Old Stone House (in J.J. Byrne Playground)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: May 3, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: May 3, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: May 3, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 4, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition – Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled


Date: May 4, 2020

In 2003, a small, timeworn leather trunk was discarded for garbage on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan; it was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th-century New York City woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street.

For almost two decades, Ms. Morrison has been on an obsessive quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

This is the first time Sylvia’s trunk and its treasured contents will be exhibited in public. On display, an invitation to a ball honoring the Prince of Wales in 1860, letters from the Civil War, Sylvia’s journals, mourning jewelry made of human hair, paper dolls, and other ephemera. Photographs and screen-printed clothing illustrate Sylvia’s life in the present as the artist’s muse.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is. She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

“I imagine backwards; an apparition in her bygone era.
She visits me in the present as the girl of my dreams.”

Please note: The exhibition is on display from January 30 through May 4. The museum is open from noon to 5:00 p.m. on Fridays through Mondays and noon to 8:00 p.m. on Thursdays. Closed on major holidays.

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 5:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 777-1089

Location: Merchant's House Museum



First Monday Life Drawing


Date: May 4, 2020

Come out and draw! What are you doing Monday night anyhow???

Bring your tools and join us in drawing a professional life model every first Monday of the month.

All skill levels welcome. No judgment, just a friendly environment in which to practice, create, and have a great time.

The 3-hour figure drawing session takes place upstairs in the OSH Great Room, which unfortunately is not ADA accessible. The space is comfortable, clean and well lit. Chairs for everyone.

Bring your tools (no oil, acrylic or sprays, please).

We will do an hour of gestures and short poses, finishing with a 2 hour-long pose. This is an uninstructed class.

Book Your Spot!

Artwork by Bonnie S. Chen.

Start time: 7:00 pm

End time: 10:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Old Stone House (in J.J. Byrne Playground)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 5, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: May 5, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 6, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Brooklyn Traditional Slow Jam


Date: May 6, 2020

This group is an all-acoustic meetup that focuses on traditional fiddle tunes and provides a musical home for folks interested in playing tunes with other musicians, learning to play by ear, and overall increasing their own musical skill. It’s fun and welcoming to all ages and levels of playing. While we won’t play from sheet music, you can certainly use this as a reference on your own!

It’s fun and can be challenging, but is a great way to improve your playing. Bring your favorite instrument and make some new friends. You don’t have to be a great player, play in tune, or know the songs to give it a shot. If you want to suggest a song, you should either know the song well enough to play it on repeat or we can see if anyone else does!

Sign up online.

Start time: 6:00 pm

End time: 9:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Old Stone House (in J.J. Byrne Playground)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 7, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 8, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: May 8, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



Con Edison Family Days


Date: May 9, 2020

Visit the Morris-Jumel Mansion on the second Saturday of every month for ConEd sponsored Family Days.

Step into another century as you explore the period rooms of Manhattan’s oldest house. Join Morris-Jumel Mansion Museum's educators in the colonial kitchen to create hands-on arts and crafts, while learning about the historic origins and significance of the crafts you make! Draw connections between the past and present by comparing and contrasting colonial life, tools, and toys with your contemporary world.

Admission is free to the public. Free, one-hour docent tours are offered at 11:00 a.m. (Spanish-language tour) and at noon (English-language tour).

Start time: 12:00 pm

End time: 2:00 pm

Contact phone: (212) 923-8008

Location: Morris-Jumel Mansion (in Roger Morris Park)



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: May 9, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: May 9, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: May 10, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: May 10, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 11, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 12, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: May 12, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 13, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 14, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



Exhibition Fire and Tide: Huguenot Beach in Artifacts and Art


Date: May 15, 2020

What began as a shared curiosity, Staten Island residents Val Falcone and Michael Shanley have embarked on a quest to uncover the history and subsequent transformation of Huguenot Beach.

We invite the public to join us in an exploration of the art and artifacts we have assembled throughout our journey. In addition to displaying one of the most comprehensive collections of Terra Marine Inn artifacts, the exhibit will also feature driftwood sculpture crafted from local materials, mixed media projects inspired by historical events and beach ephemera, and a photographic retrospective of Huguenot over the past 120 years.

This project is made possible (in part) by a DCA Premier Grant from Staten Island Arts, with public funding from the NYC Dept. Of Cultural Affairs.

Start time: 10:00 am

End time: 3:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Visitor Center (in Conference House Park)



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: May 15, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



PhiloSonia presents "Voyage V: American Road Trip" Concert


Date: May 15, 2020

PhiloSonia rounds out their "Voyage" season with a musical road trip across America.

The program is as follows:

  • John Adams - "Road Movies" for Violin and Piano
  • Amy Beach - String Quartet op. 89
  • Jessica Meyer - "Getting Home (I must be..)" for String Quintet
  • Libby Larsen - Four on the Floor for Violin, Cello, Bass, and Piano
  • A. Dvorak - String Quartet Op. 96, "American"

Performers include Stanichka Dimitrova & Igor Pikayzen on violin; Chieh-Fan Yiu on viola; Michael Katz on cello; Try Rinker on bass; Nana Shi on piano

Purchase tickets online.

Start time: 7:30 pm

End time: 8:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Old Stone House (in J.J. Byrne Playground)



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: May 16, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



JAY JAXON: 40 Years Of Fashion Design Brilliance | Past, Present, Future


Date: May 16, 2020

The Jay Jaxon exhibition celebrates the life of Queens native Jay Jaxon as an American Fashion Designer, Haute Couture Designer, and Costume Designer. Further, it restores the history of Jaxon by displaying artifacts and objects from his personal design archives as well as primary sources from the research of fashion scholar and guest curator Rachel Fenderson.

#jayjaxonqueens

Jay Jaxon Biography

Jay Jason Jaxon was born on August 30, 1941, in Queens, New York. Jaxon would grow up to become a fashion designer, making historical imprints on the concrete streets of New York City, as well as the cobblestoned roads of Paris, and on the Hollywood walk of fame in Los Angeles. Jaxon is the youngest of four, born to Ethel Rena-Jackson and Sidney Jackson. Jaxon established a brand heralding his newly recommended and officially changed name of “Jay Jason Jaxon”, prior to his leave for Paris in 1968. When Jay Jaxon moved to France, the beginning of his career in Paris would commence a few months prior to the assassination of Civil Rights Leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in America as well as the May 1968 massive student-led protest in Paris.

Jaxon gained a wealth of design knowledge by working for these couture Maisons: Jean-Louis Scherrer, Yves Saint Laurent, and Marc Bohan for Christian Dior as an Assistant Designer. In the mid-70s, Jaxon returned to New York City and once again created his own collections, while designing for Pierre Cardin, Jay Jaxon for Benson & Partners, Jou-Jou, Jay Jaxon for Muney, John Kloss, and Jay Jaxon for The New Pliers. Next, Jaxon moved out to California at the persuasion of his “play cousin” Lester Wilson, the renowned choreographer. While in Los Angeles, Jaxon designed for Jill Richards, created theatrical costumes for celebrities such as Thelma Houston, Diahann Carroll, Sammy Davis Jr., and Luther Vandross. For television shows, he designed costumes for The Division, Angel, Ally McBeal, and Sabrina: The Teenage Witch. In film, Jaxon created costumes on behalf of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, The Men’s Club, and in stage for: Ailey Celebrates Ellington and The Colors of Christmas.

About the Guest Curator Rachel Fenderson

Rachel Fenderson was born and raised in Queens, New York, to Jamaican parents. During her youth, she worked hard as a student all the while being drawn to fabrics, design, and creation. In 2002, Fenderson pursued a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature at Hofstra University. Next, Fenderson attended Parsons The New School for Design and completed a Fashion Studies, Applied Associates Science degree of Fashion Design in 2008. On January 1, 2011, Rachel Fenderson and her sister Marsha Fenderson, founded a womenswear company monikered: Pepper Jacques.

By 2016, Fenderson furthered her education at Parsons Paris: The New School for Design in Paris, France. In May 2018, Fenderson completed her Master’s thesis JAY JAXON: A Biographical Study and Media Discourse Analysis Reinstating A Designer Into Fashion History. Pursuing this degree gave her the opportunity to write the first biographical thesis study on the designer Jay Jaxon.

Fenderson displayed her first exhibition on Jaxon at the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris (2018). At the Queens Public Library in Queens, New York, Fenderson brought her exhibition on Jay Jaxon to the United States for the month of August 2019.

To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of Jay Jaxon’s historical Couturier role, Fenderson will exhibit his work at the Queens Historical Society from February 2020 – December 2020.

Start time: 2:30 pm

End time: 4:30 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Kingsland Homestead (in Margaret I. Carman Green - Weeping Beech)



George Way Treasures at the Conference House


Date: May 17, 2020

Kick off spring at Conference House Park, the southernmost point in New York State.

The Conference House Association is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition: George Way Treasures. The late Mr. George Way was a collector and expert in 17th-century art and antiques. This new exhibition, with items from his collection, includes period paintings and chairs along with complimenting items from the Conference House permanent collection.

Pieces of special note also on display are recently acquired pewter artifacts, a gift of Thoma Robertson, a past president and long time board member.

Please note: The exhibit opens at 4:00 p.m. on March 26. An opening reception will take place from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on that day.

Start time: 1:00 pm

End time: 4:00 pm

Contact phone:

Location: Conference House Museum (in Conference House Park)



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